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Auburn Fall  
September 1-4, 2011

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Fort Lauderdale

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  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton
  • 1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton


1934 Auburn Twelve Salon Phaeton

Lot No. 4123

Auctioned on Saturday, September 3, 2011

Multiple AACA and Pebble Beach Award Winner

Sold for $292,600

Purchased by noted collector Dr. Barbara Mae Atwood in 1987 from Ervin F. McClellan of Saginaw, Michigan, this Auburn Phaeton Sedan was completely restored in 1990 by Steve Babinsky of New Jersey. In 1991, it earned AACA National First Junior and Senior honors, with wins at five AACA regional meets. It also received the ACD Award from AACA that year, but the jewel in its crown was a Second in Class showing at Pebble Beach. It received an AACA Grand National First at Dayton, Ohio, in 1992.

After nearly two decades, the car retains much of its glow, with its two-tone green paint shining deeply and showing virtually no visible flaws. The body is straight and true, with good alignment of doors, all of which shut well. The brightwork is exceptional, with wide trim molding around the beltline, window frames and chrome wire wheels. The car is fitted with Woodlite headlamps and matching cowl lamps. The tan canvas top is like new, and a clear plastic cover protects it while the car is stored. The seats are handsomely upholstered in green leather with black piping. The dashboard and gauges are fully restored. Green carpeting lines the floor of the rear compartment, while a black rubber mat covers the front. The engine is clean and correct, painted dark green with black manifolds and ancillaries. The undercarriage and running gear are painted in the medium green of the body, and remain virtually spotless.

Auburns of the 1930s were incredibly good value. This car sold new for $1,545, less than a third of the cost of the equivalent Packard Super Eight. That differential has long been history, but well-restored Auburns still represent good value in the collector car market.
More to the point, the Salon Twelve represents the ultimate evolution of Auburn’s finest car; with only a handful in this condition, this lovely example will shine in any collection of American Classics.


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